Water Plan Projects

The Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) works to promote projects in each of Colorado's major river basins. Unlike other states, Colorado does not directly build many of its water projects, and instead, partners with local groups to develop water projects. The CWCB provides grant funding and other support to groups like the nine basin roundtables who are the major drivers of local water planning and key players in developing water projects.

As the basins update their Basin Implementation Plans and gather data about local projects, the state is working alongside them to develop a projects database - sometimes called an Identified Projects & Processes (IPP) database. The projects database will be a dynamic list of all the water projects underway across the state that can be updated and added to.

Basins have been working to gather information about local projects that will allow them to prioritize these projects into tiers based on how quickly they could begin. In July 2020, the Governor announced that one of his Wildly Important Goals will support this effort - aiming to gather 500 projects with good data that are ready to launch by June of 2021.

Learn more about the grassroots basin roundtable process and the original 2015 Basin Implementation Plans here.

The Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) works to promote projects in each of Colorado's major river basins. Unlike other states, Colorado does not directly build many of its water projects, and instead, partners with local groups to develop water projects. The CWCB provides grant funding and other support to groups like the nine basin roundtables who are the major drivers of local water planning and key players in developing water projects.

As the basins update their Basin Implementation Plans and gather data about local projects, the state is working alongside them to develop a projects database - sometimes called an Identified Projects & Processes (IPP) database. The projects database will be a dynamic list of all the water projects underway across the state that can be updated and added to.

Basins have been working to gather information about local projects that will allow them to prioritize these projects into tiers based on how quickly they could begin. In July 2020, the Governor announced that one of his Wildly Important Goals will support this effort - aiming to gather 500 projects with good data that are ready to launch by June of 2021.

Learn more about the grassroots basin roundtable process and the original 2015 Basin Implementation Plans here.

  • Basin Work Plans

    05 Oct 2020

    Each basin has worked with with the General Contractor and their Local Experts to lay out a detailed work plan.

  • Wildly Important Goals

    01 Jul 2020

    Governor Polis announced his Wildly Important Goals (WIGs) for the year. Including in these is a Water WIG that aims to support the existing basin implementation plan process by setting a June 2021 goal to identify 500 projects across the state that have great data and are ready to launch. This goal layers on to the existing basin work to enhance project data and tier projects. The CWCB is grateful to have the Governor's support of these efforts and focus on getting an array of projects that are emblematic of all the areas of the Water Plan. You can learn more here.

    “Water is the lifeblood of our economy and this WIG sets a state goal to identify 500 ready or near ready projects, backed by strong data and representative of our Colorado values. From our vibrant cities to our growing suburbs to our thriving agriculture, and for our quality of life and protecting our rivers and watersheds, this goal advances the Colorado Water Plan.”
    - Governor Jared Polis

    “The Colorado Water Conservation Board is thankful to have the Governor’s support for meeting a need identified in the Colorado Water Plan - to get better cost data for identified projects. Now is such a critical time for us all to be working together to make a strong business case for the projects that are so important to local communities across the state who all depend on water for cities, watershed health and farming and ranching.”
    - Director Rebecca Mitchell